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Music effects Dyslexia

Music effects Dyslexia

Music effects Dyslexia video

The publication of a book with this title has sharpened people’s interest in how dyslexia affects musicians and how those with the familiar traits need to create strategies to help them through their problems. These difficulties will not be the same in each person, any more than the insights they often show.

One of the major achievements in the last decade has been “examination bodies” recognition that more time is required for aspects of a music examination like sight-reading. The oft-heard, and very revealing, cry is “It looks like sight-reading every time I return to it”. Unsurprisingly the major tenets of neurological research in the general field of dyslexia concerning e.g. lack of fast processing, limitations on working memory, or an assumption of automaticity skills, reveal themselves in musical activity.

In the professional world, opera singers are a good example of strategies needing to be organised, simply because they (together of course with concerto players) cannot have recourse to the music during performance. Some may devise grand audio-plans which remind them of the progress of stage activity, succession of arias, and chorus work, onto which to place their previous hard work at learning their own part with maximum security.

Music effects Dyslexia

Click picture above
Teacher guide to Music and Dyslexia

At another level the personal disorganisation which often accompanies dyslexia has its manifestations in music: for example losing track of time, forgetting to turn up to lessons, forgetting instrument and music to be brought to lessons. The frequent inability to complete a task in the normal space of time leads to frustrations as often in music as elsewhere, and we must remember that there are five things that must be brought to bear:

  • the music notation
  • the eye, brain
  • mechanical manipulation
  • control of resultant sound when music is played
  • keeping the pulse.

The first two are not requirements of course when jazzers, or an Asian music ensemble are improvising, and the fourth is a different kind of manipulation for singers.

It has become accepted that young pupils make greater progress in the long run if their early days in music are full of variety. There is often more than one way to approach a critical learning point, and the step by step approach, with no assumptions made, pays dividends.

The term ‘multi-sensory’ comes into its own and the good teacher tries all sorts of angles through which to embed easy recall of fingerings, recognition of rhythmic patterns, the understanding of pitch, and relation to notation etc. Teachers also need to be wise to pupils trying to give the impression that they are reading the music when in fact they have tried to memorise it, and not done so accurately.

We have to acknowledge that music’s own arrangements are potentially unhelpful. The time signatures look like, but are not, fractions. Directions can be in one of at least four languages. There is a great deal on the page and there are graphic signs as well as notes.

It may well be that choosing a single line instrument rather than piano for the first attempts is a good idea, particularly if music notation is also being encountered for the first time. Electronic keyboards may cloud this general advice as initially they may not require either two-handed playing or two-stave reading.

dyslexics with music

dyslexics with music

 

Creative Website
Paul Ross – Dyslexic thought in words

Info

Hello,

My name is Paul Hugh Ross, Hugh is the name of my godfather whom I never see, it’s a tradition passed down from the family, not the never seeing part, just the name!

On this day you find me up to my neck in my mid life revelation.

I have been told I am Dyslexic and it is a word I feel gets banded about without people really understanding. Everyone knows the name but how many have seen some parts of its colours? My mind has always been a rainbow of colours on full speed, with the only constant thing being my loving wife. I write my thoughts, then she, with the patience of a Saint, will go over each word so my thoughts can be heard when I am not there.

I had been to at least eleven schools by the age of thirteen, lived in numerous parts of Southampton, passed from aunty to uncle, ripped from Southampton to London, London to Southampton then ripped back to London as my family worked as publicans. At the age of thirteen they were told I was completely illiterate, something I knew all along, with the help of my family, school, my own inclination to work at school I, at twenty-one, a week after my first angel was born, I entered adult education as a complete illiterate. Wanting just to be able to read a book to my daughter at bedtime and with one to one help from ladies (who’s names I have forgotten but will never forget their help and kindness.) I can now read with my spelling still, well over the rainbow! J

I started writing when I was about 38, right out of the blue while reading a book (I didn’t do that very often either). A thought came to me and I had a pen without paper, my loving wife said write your thoughts on the book, my life has never been the same from that moment on.

I think we are all the things that have happened to us. IF ANY PART HAD CHANGED I may not have turned out the way I am, and from the age of forty, I am happy, just unable to thank some for their help in the education of my life.

I believe – All we can do in life is Agree, Disagree Or foolishly think we can go through life without taking part.

 

Helpful Strategies.

Individuals will need to devise some strategies of their own to surmount some of the problems, for example:

  • Some projects link colours to letter-names, (this is different from using coloured overlays to minimise the black-white glare from the page.)
  • A percussionist, moving between stands in an orchestra to play the gong just after the triangle, may need to mark his part or get a colleague nudge him at a certain point.
  • ‘Diminuendo’ can be aligned with dimming the lights.
  • There may be a way of remembering how many sharps a scale has, or the names of the treble clef lines, so, not ‘Every Good Boy…..’ these days surely, but in the vernacular of ex-England soccer coaches: Excellent Game Beckham Done Fabulous.

The most helpful mnemonics might be those devised personally.

Other strategies will include avoiding:

  • the obvious left-hand-right-hand laterality problem,
  • overloading the pupil with too many directions,
  • the slightest evidence of impatience.

Also, helping pupils to analyse their learning styles will assist the teacher to go hand in hand with the pupil in charting the best course to bring pleasure rather than frustration.

It is pleasing to record that success in music activity can boost dyslexics’ self-esteem enormously and can encourage re-visiting of other learning areas which might have seemed difficult earlier. We also know that singing and choral experiences can be supportive as, if arising from the music text rather than learned by rote, they involve the separation of syllables, which is one of the main areas of difficulty in reading itself.

Special arrangements in music exams

Guidelines have been established for the examination of dyslexic candidates. Music teachers will have details.

Syllabuses and the guidelines are available from the Head of UK and Ireland Administration, Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music.

Trinity College London also offer accredited qualifications, please see below details:

Resources

Guide for Music Teachers on Music and Dyslexia

Music and Dyslexia, Opening New Doors Edited by Tim Miles & John Westcombe, published by Whurr (2001)

Music and Dyslexia: A Positive Approach
Edited by Tim Miles John Westcombe, Diana Ditchfield , published by Wiley (2008)

Instrumental Music for Dyslexics: A Teaching Handbook by Sheila Oglethorpe, published by Whurr (2002)

Famous
  • Famous Dyslexics

    A-Z Celebrity Dyslexics

     

    A

    Anthony Andrews – Actor

    Kirsty Alsopp – TV presenter

    Damon Albarn – Singer / Song writer

    Muhammad Ali – Former Boxer

    Fred Astaire – Actor

    B

    David Bailey – Photographer

    Louis Barnett- Chocolatier and Entrepreneur

    Michael Barrymore – TV personality

    Orlando Bloom – Actor

    Marlon Brando – Actor

    Richard Branson – Entrepreneur

    Sarah Brightman – Actor and singer

    Alexander Graham Bell – Inventor

    Darcey Bussell – Ballet dancer

    Harry Belafonte – Actor / Singer

    George Burns – Entertainer

    C

    Gary Chapman – Film script writer

    Cher – Singer

    Agatha Christie – Writer

    Margi Clarke – TV presenter and actor

    Steven J Connell – TV writer and author

    Chuck Close – Artist

    Brian Conley – Comedian and actor

    Tom Cruise – Actor

    D

    Roald Dahl – Author

    Leonardo da Vinci – Artist

    Patrick Dempsey – Actor

    Walt Disney – Film producer

    Kristian Digby – TV presenter

    Duchess of York

    E

    Thomas Edison – Inventor

    Albert Einstein – Scientist

    Bella Emberg – TV personality and comedian

    Ben Elton – Comedian

    Erin Pizzey- started first women’s refuge

    F

    Sophy Fisher – Journalist

    Lorna Fitzsimmons – MP

    David Fogel – Buying and Merchandising Director of Hamleys

    Esther Freud – Novelist

    Harrison Ford – Actor

    Michael Faraday – Chemist and Physicist

    Dustin Hoffman – Actor

    G

    Noel Gallagher – Singer

    AA Gill – Journalist

    Whoopi Goldberg – Actor

    Bill Gates – Microsoft Chairman

    Duncan Goodhew – Former Olympic Swimmer

    Antony Gormley – Sculptor

    Danny Glover – Actor

    Hamish Grant – Chief Executive of Axeon

    Nanci Griffith – Folk singer

    H

    Jerry Hall – Model

    Susan Hampshire – Actor

    Guy Hands – EMI Chairman

    Woody Harrelson – Actor

    Lord Philip Harris – Entrepreneur and millionaire

    Salma Hayek – Actor

    Johnny Herbert – Formula One racing Driver

    Tommy Hilfiger – Designer

    Anthony Hopkins – Actor

    Jack Horner – Palaeontologist

    Bob Hoskins – Actor

    Louise Hunt – Actor

    Carol Harrison – Actor

    I

    John Irving – Author

    Eddie Izzard – Comedian

    J

    Steve Jobs – Founder of Apple

    Magic Johnson – Basketball player

    Bruce Jenner – Olympian

    K

    Felicity Kendall – Actor

    Nigel Kennedy – Violinist

    Jodie Kidd – Supermodel

    Keira Knightley – Actor

    L

    Lara Flynn Boyle- Actress

    Jay Leno – TV presenter

    Kenny Logan – Rugby Player

    Lynda La Plante – TV writer

    John Lennon – Musician

    Carl Lewis – Olympian

    Sandy Lyle – Golfer

    K

    Ingvar Kamprad – Founder of Ikea

    M

    Charles Rennie Mackintosh – Artist and designer

    Lord McAlpine

    Simon Menzies – Painter

    Mika – Singer

    Paul Merson – footballer

    Sarah Miles – Actor

    Jo Malone – Retailer

    John Madjeski – Businessman

    Kim Marsh – Actor

    James Martin – Chef

    O

    Dominic O’Brien – Word memory champion

    Jamie Oliver – Chef

    Ozzy Osbourne – Rock star

    P

    Theo Paphitis – Chairman/Chief Executive – Ryman and Partners

    Marco Pierre-White – Chef

    River Phoenix – Actor

    Pablo Picasso – Artist

    R

    Prince Harry

    Princess Beatrice

    Sir Steven Redgrave – Former Olympic rower

    Oliver Reed – Actor

    Beryl Reid – Actor

    Auguste Rodin – Sculptor

    Zara Reid – Businesswoman

    Guy Ritchie – Director

    Auguste Rodin – Sculptor

    Lord Richard Rogers – Architect

    Lee Ryan – Singer

    S

    Eric Shipton – Mountaineer and explorer

    Sir Jackie Stewart – Racing driver

    Peter Stringfellow – Businessman

    Matthew Sturgis – Journalist

    Steven Spielberg – Director

    Sylvester Stallone – Actor

    Rick Stein – Chef

    Imogen Stubbs – Actor

    Jo Self – Artist

    Joss Stone – Singer

    T

    Mackenzie Thorpe – Artist

    Anthea Turner – TV presenter

    Liv Tyler – Actor

    Billy Bob Thornton – Actor

    Brian Turner – Chef

    V

    Kevin Viner – Chef

    W

    Henry Winkler – Actor

    Ben Way – Entrepreneur

    Zelda West-Meads – Relationship counsellor

    Ruby Wax – TV presenter

    James Whale – Presenter

    Andy Warhol – Artist

    David Whiffen – Chef

    Marco Pierre White – chef

    Mark Wilkinson – Furniture Designer

    Toyah Wilcox – TV personality

    Lord Willis – Author

    Terence Woodgate – Furniture Designer

    Zoe Wannamaker – Actor

    Lindsay Wagnar – Actor

    Y

    William Butler Yeats – Poet

    Murray Lachlan Young – Poet

    Z

    Benjamin Zephaniah – Poet

  • Local Dyslexia Associations

    Local Dyslexia Associations

    Local Dyslexia Associations (LDAs) are independently registered charities. They have helplines, befrienders and computer co-ordinators. They hold meetings with speakers and workshops, run courses, and have literature for sale and for borrowing. LDAs know of local facilities for assessment and tuition.

    General Helpliners answer all enquiries, unless there is an Adult helpliner as well.
    An answerphone may refer you to a rota duty number.
    The phone and e-mail may belong to different people.
    Most of the Helpliners are volunteers using family phones, with limited time, so please respect the times given.

    Please note: Local Dyslexia Associations are manned by volunteers and your courtesy is appreciated.

    Local Dyslexia Associations are listed by county.

    BEDFORDSHIRE

    South Bedfordshire Dyslexia Association

    General Enquiries: 01582 752 444.
    Available: Evenings & Weekends. Answer machine available.
    E-mail: enquiries@southbedsda.org.uk
    Web: http://www.southbedsda.org.uk
    Area: Bedfordshire & Luton, Bedford, Central Bedfordshire.


    BERKSHIRE

    Dyslexia Association of Windsor, Maidenhead, Slough and Bracknell.

    General Enquiries: 07710 012 560.
    Available: Mornings.

    Adult Dyslexia Centre (Thames Valley).

    General Enquiries. 07921 022 589.
    Available: 9am to 6pm Weekdays.
    E-mail: askus@adult-dyslexia-centre.co.uk
    Web: http://www.adult-dyslexia-centre.co.uk
    Area: Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, parts of Oxfordshire and Surrey.

    Wokingham and Reading Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 07806 230 044.
    Availability: Leave message and call will be returned on Monday evenings.
    E-mail: maindavide@hotmail.com
    Web: http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/Wokingham_Dyslexia_Support_Group

    West Berkshire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01635 298 864.
    Available: e-mail preferred.
    E-mail: calpounds@supanet.com
    Web: http://www.wbdyslexia.org.uk
    Area: West Berkshire: Newbury area.


    BUCKINGHAMSHIRE

    South Buckinghamshire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01494 534 872.
    Available: 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday.
    Area: South Buckinghamshire.

    Adult Dyslexia Centre (Thames Valley).

    General Enquiries. 07921 022 589.
    Available:9am to 6pm Weekdays.
    E-mail: askus@adult-dyslexia-centre.co.uk
    Web: http://www.adult-dyslexia-centre.co.uk
    Area: Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, parts of Oxfordshire and Surrey.


    CAMBRIDGESHIRE.

    Peterborough and District Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01733 808 076.
    Area: Peterborough and Cambridgeshire.


    CHANNEL ISLANDS.

    Jersey Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01534 861 615.
    Available: Mornings and evenings after 7:30pm.
    E-mail: ruth.smith@jerseymail.co.uk

    Adult: 01534 618 391.
    Available: Anytime
    E-mail: annek@jerseymail.co.uk

    Web: http://www.jerseydyslexia.com
    Area: Channel Islands


    CHESHIRE.

    Cheshire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01270 668 600.
    Available: As and when able to answer phone.
    E-mail: cda@s-cheshire.ac.uk
    Web: http://www.cheshire-dyslexia.info
    Area: Cheshire, North Wales


    CORNWALL.

    Cornwall Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01872 27 48 27.
    Available: Varies each week.
    E-mail: helpline@cornwalldyslexia.org.uk

    Adult: 01872 222 911.
    Available: Wednesday, Thursday and Friday mornings only.
    E-mail: adultdyslexia@cornwalldyslexia.org.uk

    Web: http://www.cornwalldyslexia.org.uk
    Area: Cornwall TR and some PL.


    CUMBRIA.

    South Cumbria Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01539 742632. Also 07586 747121.
    Available: Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 9:30am to 5pm.
    E-mail: scuda.kendal@talk21.com
    Web: http://www.scudauk.co.uk
    Area: South Lakes, Barrow, Ulverston, Kendal, Millom, Ambleside.

    West Cumbria Dyslexia Association

    General Enquiries: 07704 326 452.
    Area: Copeland & Allerdale, West Cumbria.


    DERBYSHIRE.

    The Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0115 924 6888.
    Available: Monday to Friday. 9:30am to 4:30pm.
    E-mail: helpline@dyslexia.uk.net
    Web: http://www.dyslexia.uk.net
    Area: Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Rutland.


    DEVON.


    DORSET.

    Dorset Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01202 241 992.
    Available: Anytime but preferably not 11:30pm to 8:45pm.
    Area: Dorset, Bournemouth and Poole.


    DURHAM

    Dyslexia North East.

    General Enquiries: 0786 826 3696.
    Available: Daytime and Evening (answerphone message).
    E-mail: info@dyslexianortheast.org
    Web: http://www.dyslexianortheast.org
    Area: NE England, Northumberland, Tyne & Wear, Durham.


    EAST SUSSEX.


    EAST YORKSHIRE.


    ESSEX.


     

    GLOUCESTERSHIRE.

    Gloucestershire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 07963 932 966
    Available: 8am to 8pm.
    E-mail: info@gloucestershiredyslexia.org.uk
    Web: http://www.gloucestershiredyslexia.org.uk


    HAMPSHIRE.

    Hampshire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 02380 333 345.
    Available: 24/7 Answer phone only
    E-mail: help@hantsda.org.uk
    Web: http://www.hantsda.org.uk
    Area: Hampshire, Southampton, Portsmouth, Isle of Wight.


    HEREFORDSHIRE.

    Hereford and Worcester Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01386 751 337.
    Available: Afternoons 2pm to 8pm.
    E-mail: info@hwda.org.uk
    Web: http://www.hwda.org.uk


    HERTFORDSHIRE.

    Hertfordshire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01727 867 399.
    Available: Weekdays 12:30pm to 3pm.
    E-mail: michael.paterson@tiscali.co.uk


    KENT.

    Kent West Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0845 601 2553.
    Available: 9am to 1pm, 2pm to 5pm.
    Web: http://www.kentwestdyslexia.org.uk
    Area: Tonbridge, Malling, Sevenoaks, Tunbridge Wells, Maidstone, mainly TN postcodes, bits of DA, ME.

    South Kent Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01233 850 273.
    Available: Normal office hours.
    E-mail: enquiries@southkentdyslexia.org.uk
    Web: http://www.southkentdyslexia.org.uk
    Area: Ashford borough council & Folkestone TN23 & TN24 Approx

    Dyslexia House Association.

    General Enquiries: 01622 791 843.
    Available: Tuesday to Thursday, 10am to 3pm. 07939 232 537 Monday and Friday.
    E-mail: dyslexia.house@googlemail.com
    Web: http://www.medwaydys.org
    Area: Medway & Mid-Kent. Medway authority & Kent county council.


    LANCASHIRE.

    Preston and District Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01772 619 640.
    Available: 10am to 8pm Weekdays.
    Web: http://www.discoverdyslexia.com
    Area: Lancashire (except East, NorthEast), Blackpool. PR1 to 7, PR25 & 26, FY1 to 8, LA1 to 5 part 6, L39 & 40.

    North East Lancashire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01254 230 756.
    Available: Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm.
    E-mail: nelda@hotmail.com
    Area: BB Postcodes.


    LEICESTERSHIRE.

    Leicestershire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01509 213 262
    Available: Daytime, evenings and weekends.
    E-mail: roshenshaw@hotmail.com

    Adults: 07974 196 461.
    Available: Weekdays only.
    E-mail: office@tractorparts.co.uk
    Web: http://www.lda-dyslexia.org.uk
    Area: Leicester City & Leicestershire. All LE postcodes.


    LINCOLNSHIRE.

    The Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0115 924 6888.
    Available: Monday to Friday. 9:30am to 4:30pm.
    E-mail: helpline@dyslexia.uk.net
    Web: http://www.dyslexia.uk.net
    Area: Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Rutland.


    GREATER LONDON

    Dyslexia Association of Bexley, Bromley, Greenwich, Lewisham.

    General Enquiries: 07000 50 50 55.
    Available: Variable (answerphone). Admin: 0208 3152 526.
    E-mail: info@dyslexiawise.co.uk
    Web: http://www.dyslexiawise.co.uk
    Area: BR1 to 8, DA5 to 8, DA14 to18, SE2 to 4, SE6 to10, SE12 to14, SE18,21,23,26,28.

    Croydon Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 08442 49 69 49.
    Available:Before 9pm.
    E-mail: CDAhelpline@hotmail.co.uk

    Adults: 08442 49 69 49.
    Available: All times, but often on answerphone.
    Web: http://www.croydononline.org/dyslexia
    Area: All CR postal areas.

    Dyslexia Association of London.

    Adults: 0208 870 1407.
    Available: All times, but often on answerphone.

    Areas: Brent, Camden, City, Hackney, Hammersmith & Fulham, Haringey, Islington, Kensington & Chelsea, Lambeth, Southwark, Tower Hamlets, Westminster.

    Ealing Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0208 998 0552.
    Available: After 6pm on weekdays.
    E-mail: snmasud@aol.com

    Adults: 0208 997 4945.
    Available: 12 noon to 2pm.
    E-mail: rosemary.palmer1@btinternet.com

    Web: http://www.ealingdyslexia.org.uk
    Area: Ealing W5,W7,W13. UB1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8. UB10 & 18.

    Merton and South West London Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0208 682 0773.
    Available: Evenings.

    Adults: 0208 947 4779.
    Available: Evenings preferred.

    Web: http://www.mertondyslexia.com
    Area: Merton, Wandsworth, Putney.

    Richmond Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0208 940 4626.
    Available: Weekday evenings 7pm to 9pm.
    E-mail: info@richmonddyslexia.org.uk
    Web: http://www.richmonddyslexia.org.uk
    Area: Richmond upon Thames.

    Sutton Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0870 888 0048.
    Available: Daytime.
    E-mail: helpline@suttondyslexia.org.uk
    Web: http://www.suttondyslexia.org.uk
    Area: London borough of Sutton SM1 to SM7.

    Waltham Forest Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0208 520 1684.
    Available: Answerphone at all times. Thursday daytime, weekends reasonable hours.
    E-mail: admin@wfda.org.uk

    Adults: 0208 520 7370.
    Available: Varies. No answerphone.

    Web: http://www.wfda.org.uk
    Area: E4,10,11,17 (Waltham Forest) Barking and Dagenham, Barnet, Enfield, Hackney, Haringey, Havering, Newham, Redbridge, South West Essex.


    GREATER MANCHESTER.

    Bolton and District Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01539 443 285.
    Available: Daytime.
    E-mail: valwhite@moorcrag.com
    Area: Bolton & District. BL1 to BL6.

    Salford Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0161 789 3152.
    Available: Daytime only.
    E-mail: SalfordDA@hotmail.com

    Adults: 0161 794 1502.
    Available: Evenings only.
    E-mail: SalfordDA@hotmail.com

    Area: Salford & East Manchester M30, M28, M27, M25, M34-M20, SK6, OL9, Rochdale.


    MERSEYSIDE.

    Liverpool Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 08702 25 28 29.
    Available: Answerphone.
    Area: Liverpool. L1 to L20, L24, L25.

    St Helens Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0844 884 9725.
    Available: Answerphone only giving drop-in meeting details and asks for e-mail address for Signpost leaflet.
    E-mail: shadda@box42.com
    Area: WA8,9,10,11. L35. WN. St Helens, Halton, Knowsley, Warrington, West Lancashire, Wigan, some of Sefton.

    Wirral Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0151 653 4040.
    Available: Answerphone 24/7. Fri 10am to 12 noon termtime.
    Area: Wirral, Ellesmere Port & Neston


    NORFOLK.

    Norfolk and Norwich Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01379 668 430.
    Available: Anytime: E-mail & answerphone.
    E-mail: BRAWhiting@aol.com
    Area: All NR post codes, IP20 to IP27, PE14, PE30 to PE38.


    NORTHAMPTONSHIRE.

    Northamptonshire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01604 820 158.
    Adults: 01327 703 626
    Available: Daytime and Evening (answerphone message).
    E-mail: info@northantsdyslexia.co.uk
    Web: http://www.northantsdyslexia.co.uk
    Area: Northants NN1 to NN29, North Bucks and Milton Keynes MK1 to MK19.


    NORTHUMBERLAND

    Dyslexia North East.

    General Enquiries: 0786 826 3696.
    Available: Daytime and Evening (answerphone message).
    E-mail: info@dyslexianortheast.org
    Web: http://www.dyslexianortheast.org
    Area: NE England, Northumberland, Tyne & Wear, Durham.


    NOTTINGHAMSHIRE.

    The Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0115 924 6888.
    Available: Monday to Friday. 9:30am to 4:30pm.
    E-mail: helpline@dyslexia.uk.net
    Web: http://www.dyslexia.uk.net
    Area: Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Rutland.


    OXFORDSHIRE.

    Oxfordshire Dyslexia Association.

    E-mail: oxford.dyslexia@gmail.com

    Adults: 01865 721 130.
    Available: Evenings.

    Web: http://www.oxdys.org.uk

    Adult Dyslexia Centre (Thames Valley).

    General Enquiries. 07921 022 589. Available: 9am to 6pm Weekdays.
    E-mail: askus@adult-dyslexia-centre.co.uk
    Web: http://www.adult-dyslexia-centre.co.uk
    Area: Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, parts of Oxfordshire and Surrey.


    PETERBOROUGH.

    Peterborough Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: currently unavailable.
    Area: Peterborough and Cambridgeshire.


    RUTLAND.

    The Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0115 924 6888.
    Available: Monday to Friday. 9:30am to 4:30pm.
    E-mail: helpline@dyslexia.uk.net
    Web: http://www.dyslexia.uk.net
    Area: Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, Rutland.


    SHROPSHIRE.

    Shropshire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01743 231 205.
    Available: Wednesdays 10:30am to 12 noon.
    E-mail: shropda@hotmail.com
    Web: http://www.thesda.org.uk
    Area: SY Shropshire, TF Telford & Wrekin.


    SOMERSET.

    Somerset Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01823 672 271.
    Available: Answerphone sometimes. Call back to landlines preferred.
    E-mail: hardwick@argonet.co.uk

    Adults: 01227 792 032.
    E-mail: alwyn.geoff@dsl.pipex.com

    Web: http://www.somersetdyslexia.co.uk
    Area: Somerset (not North Somerset).


    STAFFORDSHIRE.

    Dyslexia Association of Staffordshire.

    General Enquiries: 01782 84 87 84.
    Available: Variable. Answerphone available.
    E-mail: das@dyslexiastaffordshire.co.uk
    Web: http://www.dyslexiastaffordshire.co.uk


    SUFFOLK.

    Suffolk Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01473 717 026.
    Available: Anytime.

    Adults: 01473 437 064.
    Available: Anytime.
    Web: http://suffolkdyslexiaassociation.org.uk/
    Area: Suffolk CB 8,9 NR 32, 33, 34 IP, CO 6,7 some of 8,10


    SURREY.

    South East Surrey Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01737 556 173.
    Available: Evenings preferred.
    E-mail: sesdadyslexia@hotmail.com
    Web: http://www.sesda-dyslexia.co.uk


    TYNE AND WEAR.

    Dyslexia North East.

    General Enquiries: 0786 826 3696.
    Available: Daytime and Evening (answerphone message).
    E-mail: info@dyslexianortheast.org
    Web: http://www.dyslexianortheast.org
    Area: NE England, Northumberland, Tyne & Wear, Durham.


    WALES.

    Dyslecsia Cymru/Wales Dyslexia.

    General Enquiries: 0808 1800 110.
    Available: Office Hours.
    E-mail: c.hall@tsd.ac.uk

    Adults: 0808 1800 110.
    Available: Daytime and some Evenings.
    E-mail: Barbara.horsfall-turner@sky.com
    Web: http://www.walesdyslexia.org.uk/

    Area: Wales. Based in Camarthen.

    West Wales Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 07702 665 799.
    Available: Weekday evenings.
    E-mail: westwalesdyslexia@gmail.com
    Web: http://www.wwda.co.uk
    Area: West Wales and SA postcodes.


    WARWICKSHIRE.

    North Warwickshire and Coventry Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 024 7631 6813.
    Available: 9am. to 6pm. Answerphone 24/7
    E-mail: lesleyhill-dyslexia@ntlworld.com
    Web: http://www.justdyslexic.org.uk
    Area:Warwickshire, Coventry. CV1 to 13. B46,76,78,79.

    South Warwickshire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01789 773 758.
    E-mail: rbremnersmith@uwclub.net


    WEST MIDLANDS.

    Birmingham Adult Dyslexic Group (badg).

    Adults: 0798 605 4301.
    Available: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 10:30am to 4:30pm.
    E-mail: badg.bdart@me.com
    Web: http://www.badg.org
    Area: West Midlands: Birmingham, Coventry, Dudley, Sandwell, Solihull, Walsall, Wolverhampton. B postcodes.


    WEST SUSSEX.


    WILTSHIRE.

    Wiltshire Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01249 655 489.
    Available: 9am to 8pm (answerphone).
    E-mail: caroline.fowke@btinternet.com
    Web: http://www.wiltshiredyslexiaassociation.org
    Area: Wiltshire, Swindon. SP, SN, BA postcodes.


    WORCESTERSHIRE.

    Hereford and Worcester Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01386 751 337.
    Available: Afternoons 2pm to 8pm.
    E-mail: info@hwda.org.uk
    Web: http://www.hwda.org.uk


    YORKSHIRE.

    Leeds and Bradford Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 01274 771 153.
    Available: 10am to 6pm.
    E-mail: labda@blueyonder.co.uk
    Web: http://www.labda.org.uk/
    Area: Leeds LS, Bradford BD,YO.

    Dyslexia Network Plus.

    General Enquiries: 0845 2260 240.
    Available: During sociable hours.
    E-mail: dnplus@aol.com
    Web: http://www.dyslexianetworkplus.org.uk
    Area: Hambleton & Richmond District, North Yorkshire.

    York & District Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 07866 135 124.
    Web: http://www.yadda.org.uk


    RELATED ORGANISATIONS.

    Dyslexia Scotland.

    General Enquiries: 0844 800 84 84.
    Available: Mon to Fri. 10am to 1pm, 2pm to 4pm.
    E-mail: helpline@dyslexiascotland.org.uk
    Web: http://www.dyslexiascotland.org.uk


    Dyslexia Association Ireland.

    General Enquiries: 00 353 (0) 1679 0276.
    Available: Mon to Fri. 9:30am to 1pm, 2pm to 5pm.
    E-mail: info@dyslexia.ie
    Web: http://www.dyslexia.ie


    Manx Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 07624 315 724.
    E-mail: chrisseaward@manx.net
    Web: http://www.manxdyslexia.org


    European Dyslexia Association.

    General Enquiries: 0043 1 894 21 09.
    E-mail: contact-eda@eda-info.eu
    Web: http://www.eda-info.eu/

  • Pro Membership of BDA

    Professional Membership

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Gary trotman steelasophical

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

prsented by Gary Trotman (fellow Dyslexic)

About 

Committed to making a positive difference to peoples lives - Entrepreneur - Marketer - Contracts Manager - Director of Steelasophical Caribbean Musical Entertainment - Photographer - Spiritual LOA

About the Author
Committed to making a positive difference to peoples lives - Entrepreneur - Marketer - Contracts Manager - Director of Steelasophical Caribbean Musical Entertainment - Photographer - Spiritual LOA

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